Oral Manifestations Related to Immunosuppression Degree in HIV Positive Patients

دومين همايش ساليانه پژوهش ايدز در ايران

22 آبان 1387، تهران - ايران

Presentation Type: Speech
Abstract:

Background: The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome is the infectous disease of century Death usually results from the opportunistic infections. The onset of these complications generally is associated with a low CD4 count. Oral manifestations often found in HIV+ patients. It can be the first clinical sign of the infection and also can determined the progression of disease .The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of oral soft tissue manifestations and their relationship with the degree of immunosuppresion observed in HIV infected patients.
Material and Methods: 100 HIV+ patients (92 male,18 female) were examined, from a total of 435 patients at the Consultative Center for Behavioral Diseases in Kermanshah city between May 2006 to November 2006. The mean age of the patients was 35+7/8 years. The infection period was between 5 to 12 years. Oral lesions were evaluated according to criterias of EECclearing house. The degree of immunosuppression was based on the CD4 percentage values obtained from each patient's medical report in according to CDC classification. CD4 count closest to the oral examination.
Results: The most common oral lesions were: rampant caries (54 cases) that fallowed with periodontal disease (44 cases), hyperpigmentation (42 case), erythematous candidiasis (36 cases), xerostomia (20 cases), angular cheilitis (17cases), leukoplakia (16 cases), hairy tounge (14 cases), coated tounge (13 cases), enlargement of salivary gland (11cases), psudomembranuse candidiasis (7 cases) and linear gingival erythema (6 cases).In some cases there were two or more than two lesions .
Conclusion :According to our data,it seems that only occurrence of some oral lesions (specially infectious lesions) were related to the degree of immunosuppesion and such lesions can be considered as indicators of the progression of the HIV infection.

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