THE ROLE OF HEALTH BELIEFS IN PERFORMING PREVENTIVE BEHAVIORS IN HIGH- RISK INDIVIDUALS FOR TYPE II DIABETES

Health Promotion Perspectives

Volume 1 - Number Supple.1

Article Type: Original Article
Abstract: Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is an important health problem and leads to severe complications. Development of positive health behaviors is extremely important to prevent diabetes in high- risk individuals. This study aims at identify the relationship of health beliefs and diabetes preventive behaviors among individuals at highrisk for developing type II diabetes mellitus in Taft city. Materials and Methods: A study using the Health Belief Model (HBM) was undertaken with 114 high- risk subjects for type 2 Diabetes of both genders, by 30 and higher years old, from three urban health centers, which diagnosed as high- risk for type2 diabetes during the screening program, were recruited in this study. Research tool was a 66-item questionnaire. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: 29.8% of the subjects were male and 70.2% were female. 68.4% of the subjects had less than diploma of formal education and 89.4% of them were married. Mean score of knowledge and preventive behaviors was 5.80 ±2.87, and 5.41 ±2.83, respectively. Therefore, subjects obtained 30.05% of maximum obtainable score of preventive behaviors. There were significant correlations between preventive behaviors and perceived susceptibility, (r=0.243) (P< 0.009), perceived severity, (r=0.312)(P<0.001), perceived barrier, (r=0.245) (P<0.006) and perceived self- efficacy (r=0.497) (P<0.001). Discussion and conclusion: Despite the presence of risk factors, preventive behaviors among high- risk subjects for developing type II diabetes was poor as a result of lack of susceptibility, severity, barriers and self-efficacy perception.