Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism and the progression rate of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in Iranian children

Nephrology

Volume 8 - Number

Article Type: ---- Unspecified ----
Abstract:

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common forms of glomerulonephritis leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A few clinical and paraclinical factors are considered as contributing factors in progression rate. However, there are controversial reports on the relationship between ACE gene polymorphism and rapidity of progression of FSGS to ESRD in different populations. To elucidate this issue, we investigated the relationship between the insertion (I) and deletion (D) ACE gene polymorphism and rapidity of progression of FSGS to ESRD in Iranian children. Forty-one children aged 1-18 years admitted to St AlZahra Hospital, Isfahan, and St Ali Asghar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, with idiopathic FSGS were enrolled. Renal death was defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 50 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) or a decreased GFR to less than 50% compare to baseline. Reaching renal death in less or more than 2 years were labelled as rapid progressors (RP) or slow progressors (SP), respectively. Intron 16 of the ACE gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Twenty-eight patients were male and 13 were female. In 15 RP patients, the genotype distribution was 26.6% DD, 6.7% II and 66.7% ID. In 26 SP patients, the genotype was similar (38.6% DD, 7.6% II and 53.8% ID, P > 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences for ACE I/D gene polymorphism between the two groups of patients (P > 0.05). Our study revealed no correlation between ACE I/D gene polymorphism and rapidity of progression of FSGS to ESRD in Iranian children.